Just Eves
Image click here to visit our sponsor It's my Healthline

 

Vaginal Cancer

WHAT IS VAGINAL CANCER?

Uncontrolled growth of cancer cells in the vagina or on the vulva (vaginal lips). Can affect females of all ages, but the peak incidence is from ages 45 to 65. Women with a positive family history of cancer of reproductive organs are more at risk

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

  • Itching.
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding.
  • Discomfort or bleeding with intercourse.
  • Small or large, firm ulcerated painless growth on the vulva. Cancers on the vulva have thick, raised edges and bleed easily.

HOW TO PREVENT

  • No specific preventive measures. Have a yearly pelvic exam to detect the disease during early stages when treatment is most effective.
  • A woman must become familiar with the appearance of her genitals. In India women just do not go to a gynec after last delivery. Ideally you should use a mirror and examine yourself once a month.

DIAGNOSTIC MEASURES

  • Typical symptoms.
  • History and examination by a doctor.
  • Laboratory studies, such as a Pap smear and colposcopy.
  • Surgical diagnostic procedures such as D&C.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

Like other cancers fatal spread to other body parts. Common sites of spread are the lymph nodes in the groin, wall of the pelvis, bladder, rectum, bone, lungs or liver.

PROBABLE OUTCOME

Early detection and treatment offer a good chance for normal life expectancy. Symptoms can be relieved or controlled during treatment.

Research into causes and treatment continues, so there is hope for increasingly effective treatment and cure.

TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

  • Usually Surgery to remove the vaginal lips.
  • Radiation treatment (sometimes). External radiation shrinks the primary tumor. Internal radiation (implants) affects cancer that has spread to adjoining tissues. Implants of radium or cesium are used for 48 to 72 hours.

MEDICATION

Basically for symptoms like pain, fever, infection and constipation

ACTIVITY

  • A catheter will remain in the bladder for about 2 weeks following surgery or during radiation treatment.
  • If you have radiation implants, lie on your back while the radiation source is in place. Move your arms and legs often to prevent formation of DVT.
  • After radiation treatment--internal or external--resume your normal activities in about 5 days.
  • After surgery, resume your normal activities gradually, allowing 6 weeks for full recovery.
  • Resume sexual relations when healing is complete in 8 to 10 weeks.

CONTACT YOUR DOCTOR, IF

  • You have symptoms of cancer of the vagina or vulva.
  • The following occurs at the treatment site after surgery or radiation treatment:
    • Signs of infection, such as increasing pain, fever and swelling.
    • Excessive bleeding.
Tell me more about
Tell me more about

I want to

CALCULATORS


Send this page
Print this page